UX

Virtual is the New Face of Government

As customers and consumers become more comfortable using technology it only stands to reason that government, traditionally behind the private sector when it comes to things like process innovation, would also be utilizing technology more and more. The use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been playing an ever-expanding role into public systems for years. However, the bridge between government-based AI and citizens appears to be ready to evolve. According to industry leaders, the next phase of customer contact and information sharing will be Virtual Reality (VR) or Augmented Reality (AR). And, as AR and VR are expected to play ever increasing roles in the coming decade, systems and those associated with them will have to find new ways to...

UX Myth: People actually read on the web

Steve Krug, author of Don’t Make Me Think, claims that web users don’t read, they scan. Only when people are interested in the content do they read web pages word for word. Normally, pages are skimmed for highlighted keywords, meaningful headings, short paragraphs, and scannable lists.   Well-structured pages designed for cursory reading are more likely to be read. Web-usability studies conducted by Neilson suggest that most users read merely 28% of text on a web page, and that concise, scannable and objective copywriting can result in 124% better usability. When people arrive on a web page, they immediately begin scanning to decide whether or not the page is of value to them. For this reason, web content constructed for scannability can certainly pay off.   According to usability.gov, six factors can provide...

UX Myth: Simple = Minimal

Simple and minimal go hand in hand, but they are not synonymous. Minimal design is a visual decluttering of objects, forcing designers to say more by displaying less. It is a reduction in style elements, adding only enough to tell a story, accomplish a task, or meet product goals. According to Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO, minimalism is skin deep. What appears simple-looking can contain hidden complexities in UI.   Minimal Website: Landlife Minimal Website: basecamp Simplicity seamlessly blends the whole experience. Where there is both simplicity and usability, the overall product/application will shine. Design choices are meant to support product goals and empower users, period.   Simple Website: Apple In his book, The Laws of Simplicity,( http://lawsofsimplicity.com/, John Maeda notes, “On the one hand, you want...